Cooking information, recipes etc.

edited December 1969 in GENERAL CHAT
Here's a thread for cooking related stuff, it seems to creep into loads of other discussions.<br /><br />I started it to ask for some info.<br /><br />I'm looking to make meat stock to use in soups.<br />I intend to save chicken carcasses, meat bones etc. and freeze them till I have enough.<br /><br />I'd like some sort of mesh bag to keep the bones together in soup while cooking - is there such a thing readily available?<br />Does it have a specific name I should be looking for.<br /><br />I'd like something that was reusable if possible.
«13456723

Comments

  • I suppose you could use muslin cloth. I just use a sieve  ;)
  • There is this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lku-Cooking-Mesh-White-Luki/dp/B001ECR3A8<br />Seems very expensive though when a piece of muslin or cheesecloth tied up would do the trick nicely.
  • I make my own stock, but just strain out the bones and vegetables after cooking. If you want to keep them all together for ease of removal, a blanching basket or chip basket might be a cheap way forward.
  • I saw that and too thought it expensive.<br /><br />This is the only other thing I saw in a quick search.<br />http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Fish-soup-Filter-bag-bone-extra-large-cook-boiling-mesh-milk-bean-nut-cotton-new-/151089883643<br /><br />How would I stop a sieve keeping out all the vegetable chunks as well as the bones?
  • Just make the stock as soon as you have the bones etc. Strain it, (freeze if you want to), and then add the veg to make your soup.<br />I also use the water from boiling ham - makes good ham stock.
  • I've used the water from boiling a haggis as soup stock.<br />Worked really well.
  • I remembered I had a mesh bag among my old home-brewing stuff.<br /><br />Dug it out, it's a 'nylon straining bag'.<br />States 'may be boiled' on the packet.<br /><br />Seems really small mesh though.<br /><br />Might give it a go with the chicken carcass I'll be keeping.
  • on 1393097824:
    <br />I remembered I had a mesh bag among my old home-brewing stuff.<br /><br />Dug it out, it's a 'nylon straining bag'.<br />States 'may be boiled' on the packet.<br /><br />Seems really small mesh though.<br /><br />Might give it a go with the chicken carcass I'll be keeping.<br />
    <br /><br />Or you could just use a pair of your old fishnet tights, Jim.  :D
  • Should work fine. <br />I do find after boiling the carcass that there is still quite a bit of meat that can be picked off the bones, and the only way is by hand.
  • The idea was to use the carcass in the soup rather than making stock first, but maybe it's just easier to make stock and then use it in the soup.
  • on 1393099170:
    <br />The idea was to use the carcass in the soup rather than making stock first, but maybe it's just easier to make stock and then use it in the soup.<br />
    <br /><br />Definitely. Just boil the carcass up, drain off the stock, then pick through the rest for bits of meat and set those aside. Chuck the bones away.Make your soup with the stock  then add back the meat at the very end or it will go stringy and horrible.
  • I sometimes have a problem making chicken stock - it seems to taste bitter - am I doing something wrong??
  • I do it the latter way - boil the carcass with a couple of bay leaves and onions (usually in my pressure cooker), then strain it, retaining the onions and picking the bones, then add the veg/lentils/split peas/barley or whatever you want to add and cook again - I prepare the veg while the carcass is boiling. - oops have only just read your reply Lorna !<br /><br />I do the same with gammon/ham joint - retain the boiling water and add veg and yellow split peas.
  • on 1393099884:
    <br />I sometimes have a problem making chicken stock - it seems to taste bitter - am I doing something wrong??<br />
    <br /><br />Ooh I don't know, G. I can't think how that would happen. What sort of pot do you use?
  • I use a big metal pot ( can't remember what kind of metal - but OH says 18 gauge stainless steel ). All I know is they were from M&S and very expensive - bought them out of a very good Christmas bonus from work one year. They should be all right shouldn't they??. Doesn't always happen but does enough to put me off doing it again. Th only thing I can think of is, always having electric cookers, I inadvertently let it cook at too high a heat for a while. Maybe I should try cooking it in the slow cooker.
  • on 1393103178:
    <br />I use a big metal pot ( can't remember what kind of metal - but OH says 18 gauge stainless steel ). All I know is they were from M&S and very expensive - bought them out of a very good Christmas bonus from work one year. They should be all right shouldn't they??. Doesn't always happen but does enough to put me off doing it again. Th only thing I can think of is, always having electric cookers, I inadvertently let it cook at too high a heat for a while. Maybe I should try cooking it in the slow cooker.<br />
    <br /><br />It can't be the pot then. Any little bit of burning would make it bitter though.Other than that I don't know.  ???
  • Maybe........................................they aren't chickens  :-\
  • on 1393104642:
    <br />Maybe........................................they aren't chickens  :-\<br />
    <br /><br /> ??? Oh don't say that!<br />You didn't use the bones out of yer corsets by mistake did you?
  • No, but me wonderbra 'as turned into an downunderbra  :-\
  • on 1393105913:
    <br />No, but me wonderbra 'as turned into an downunderbra  :-\<br />
    <br /><br />Oh no, you as well? :'(
  • I made my stock. I just boiled up the bits and strained it the normal way, then added that to the soup.<br /><br />The soup pot I inherited is larger than I thought, should have enough soup for several weeks.<br /><br />I like a lot of whole dried peas in broth.<br />There was a bicarb tablet in the packet for soaking them - never seen that before.<br /><br />I'm tempted to plant some leeks.
  • I'm tempted to plant some leeks................but not in GCHQ, I hope??
  • I had another go at making toad-in-the-hole last night.<br /><br />Found this page which has a lot of ideas.<br /><br />http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2013/feb/06/how-cook-perfect-toad-in-the-hole<br /><br />I decided to experiment. <br />Used 2 eggs (normally only use one) worked really well, almost omelettey.<br />Let the batter rest for a while.<br />Added a blob of mustard to the batter - added a lovely flavour, will add even more next time.<br /><br />Best tip was to add the batter to the hot tin first, then add the cooked sausages, it ensures the bottom is sealed.<br /><br />I didn't quite cook it long enough, but I like the batter quite raw in the middle anyway, taste was lovely.<br /><br />I think where I had been going wring before was adding the batter on top of the sausages, so it wasn't sealed at the bottom, and the bater was drying out too much.
  • Yummy - couple of good tips there - especially putting in the sausages afterwards.<br />Must admit I use the Hairy Bikers batter recipe because it doesn't involve strict measurements. 4 lightly heaped tablespoonfuls of flour, two eggs and add the milk until it all has the consistency of single cream. Works every time for me - as long as the tin is smokin' hot.<br /><br />Hmm - got sausages in the shopping being delivered today - Toad might be in the offing....
  • I bake the sausages in the tin first, but this time I took them out, put the tin over a hot ring, then added the batter, then the sausages.<br /><br />The old recipe I had called for a spoonful of melted butter in the batter, but I don't buy butter these days,<br /><br />The sausages I had were fatty enough not to need any extra oil, but some of the quality sausages are too dry without oil.<br /><br />I had mine with some spinach (from frozen) but need to think of something else as an accompaniment.
  • I know its dreadful but we often have ours with tinned marrowfat peas. If not, I like cabbage with it.
  • Another favourite tonight - macaroni & cheese with baked onions.<br /><br />Hmmm, maybe baked onions would go with toad in the hole, and the oven is on anyway.<br /><br />I only recently started baking onions, I was looking for something to go with cauliflower & cheese.<br />Any excuse now, they're one of my favourites.<br /><br />Now summer is on the way, I mist remember to try barbecued shallots again.<br />Just chuck them on in their skins, once blackened, squeeze them to pop out the lovely centre.
  • on 1396872073:
    <br />I know its dreadful but we often have ours with tinned marrowfat peas. If not, I like cabbage with it.<br />
    <br /><br />I've had it with mushy peas, that worked quite well. And steamed kale.
  • Or how about a mini toad served like a pie floater?
Sign In or Register to comment.